The Best Thing Anyone Can Eat For Their Weight and Health

Blog, Food

by Melinda D. Maryniuk, MEd, RD, CDE

There’s one that dietitians, doctors and experts everywhere agree on– if someone wants to improve their diet and their health, they can’t go wrong if they focus on fiber! Though not glamorous or trendy, lots of studies have found fiber to be a key component of a healthy life.  In fact, the new Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend a high fiber diet for everyone – not just those seeking to lose weight. The guidelines are careful to highlight how personalized individual nutrition needs to be and do not endorse a single way of eating… or even recommend a calorie range. They don’t hesitate, however, to explicitly call out fiber as a superstar and offer specific recommendations for daily intake.

What is fiber and why all the fandom?

Dietary fiber includes the parts of a plant that your body can’t digest or absorb, and it is generally classified into two types: soluble (the type that can dissolve in water) and insoluble (the type that doesn’t dissolve). Many fruits, vegetables, beans and grains contain both types, which is a great thing because both types are very beneficial. A mixed fiber diet (or a diet that contains both types of fiber) has been proven to decrease incidence of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, colorectal cancer and total cancers. There’s also evidence that it improves blood pressure, insulin resistance and blood lipids. And as if that wasn’t enough, studies show high-fiber foods promote weight loss and maintenance, as well an increased lifespan.

How much fiber do I need?

The many benefits of fiber start when you’re consuming at least 25 grams a day. The guidelines give the specific daily recommendations for men and women.

 

19 – 50 years of age Over 50 years of age
Women 25g 21g
Men 38g 30g

 

What are the best ways to get more fiber in my diet?

 Fiber is only found in plant foods so by eating more of a plant-based diet (including more vegetables, whole grains, fruit, legumes, beans, nuts and seeds) you’ll get more fiber.  As much as possible, limit white, refined grains such as white flour, white pasta and white rice in order to keep the fiber content up.  Most of the fiber is in the edible skins of fruits and veggies so whenever you can – eat them whole.  Check the food labels to compare the fiber in different breads, cereals, crackers and other prepared foods.

As you go about increasing the sources of fiber in your diet – do so gradually.  This will limit possible side effects of stomach upset or diarrhea.  Also, drink plenty of water as you are increasing the fiber in your diet. 

While almost all plant foods contain some fiber, this list highlights some that are particularly good, and some that are even better! 

 

  Good Sources Even Better Sources
Breads. Cereals and Grains Whole wheat bread, brown rice, popcorn, oatmeal

 

Quinoa, pearl barley, whole wheat spaghetti, All-bran cereal
Fruit Fresh fruits: Apple, pear, orange, strawberries, blueberries, kiwi Raspberries, avocado, guava, passion fruit, blackberries
Vegetables Carrots, spinach, corn, asparagus, zucchini, potato Collard greens, green peas, broccoli, acorn squash
Beans, Peas, Legumes Lima beans, green peas, chickpeas, kidney beans Lentils, split peas, black, pinto and navy beans
Nuts and Seeds Almonds, pistachios, pecans, walnuts, sunflower seeds Chia seeds, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds

 

To learn more about different eating habits, click here.

To find a weight management physician in the United States near you, click here.

To find a weight management physician in Canada near you, click here.

To sign up for our free online email program to learn the science of weight management, click here.

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